[MISC] Development Dance

Nothing new to developers but for some reason sometimes hard to grasp for the profane, the development dance is something that should be taught in schools.

In the mind of the non technical customer/boss, “development” is the process of going from nothing to a highlighted goal (specs, screens, that kind of things).

Most of the time, if you do a whole project with only developers attached to the process, for us code monkeys, it’s more like building something with Lego(s; bricks) : we build something that works, then iterate towards something like an ideal.

Cultural clash happens when the goal isn’t realistic from the point of view of the dev, but is non negotiable from the point of view of the non dev.

Which leads to the Dance : we take a few steps back on the goal, then a couple of steps sideways, then a few steps forward again.

Non technical people have to understand that’s the only way they can get close to what they want. Because the technical side is fraught with pitfalls, unwanted deadlines, miscomprehension, etc. Many a good feature started as a “what if?” coming from down below, only made possible because the foundations allowed them.

Going for a strict top-to-bottom approach gives you apps or websites riddled with bugs (because, as hard as you try, users will always use your work in a way it’s not supposed to support, or that you didn’t think of), and a strict bottom-to-top approach gives apps that are bland or ugly or without global vision.

Only a smart collaboration of the two can result in a decent product. Agree on key features, on a way the program should be handled in a way that’s considered normal, and fill the blanks as you go. That way, devs can geek out and build foundations that will handle anything and everything that they can think of, without having to fear you will change your mind once the hard work is done, and the non-techs can leverage the tech savvy to get something that will satisfy their itch of a beautiful, sensical product.

As with any relationship, concessions have to be made, and so far, the dominant culture has mostly been that developers don’t – and shouldn’t – have any input on the project, that developers are executants. What more companies get in return is a passive aggressive stance of “I’m going to do exactly what you asked, so that you can see it fail miserably”.

  

Leave a Reply